R.M Schindler

 

The early modernist Lechner House by R. M. Schindler was featured on the cover of last Sunday’s New York Times Style Magazine.  Restored by architect Pamela Shamshiri, who lives in it with her two children, it’s a modernist’s dream. I poured over the article, noting every wonderful detail and marveled at the extent to which Shamshiri had gone to restore and renew this Schindler masterpiece. In my research I found a video made to market the house prior to its restoration.  It shows that much of Schindler’s original design had been renovated out of existence. Hat’s off to Ms Shamshiri for having restored and thus saved a noteworthy work by an important early modernist.  Continue reading

Gio Ponti’s Parco Dei Principi

Parco Dei Principi

Design destinations are often a little disappointing. As the years go by structures are re-purposed or the inhabitants want something new. So it’s rare to see a place left just as the architect wished it to be. Gio Ponti’s Parco dei Principe Hotel in Sorrento is true to the vision of the master.
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Treasures of Antiquity and An Important Show at the National Gallery of Art

Ishtar Gate Pergamon Museum

In November I wrote a post called The 3 Things you Need to Know About your Dealer. Under the topic of taste, I briefly touched upon an aspect of all dealer/scholars. We’re tireless aesthetes, passionate about beauty in all things. Whether it’s trips to museums or a walk down the block, everything gets funneled through our inherent visuality. I hope to share the beautiful things I’ve seen with you through blogging. Our world is a veritable feast for the eyes.

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Entrances—First Impressions

Pariser Plaz 3 Berlin Gehry Partners

New Year’s is upon us and with it, the opportunity for a fresh start. It’s the time of year we say goodbye to the past; hello to the future. A new year is mysterious—you never know what’s coming, only what’s been. The turn of the year, and entrance into the next phase of our lives is filled with anticipation. I’ve always felt that entrances carry that same sense of mystery and promise. They set the tone of a place and of what’s to come. Entries say, “THIS is what to expect. THIS is what I’m about.” The design, color, size and forms all speak to us. So, the beginning of 2016 seemed a perfect time for a blogger like me, whose interests are art, design and architecture, to consider doorways and entries, the first thing we encounter when we come to a place.  Continue reading

Carlo Scarpa’s Castelvecchio Museum

Castelvecchio

On November 21st, The New York Times reported a robbery at the Castelveccchio, museum in Verona Italy. Seventeen masterpieces by Tintoretto, Mantegna and Peter Paul Rubens were taken. The incredibly amateurish robbers, after demanding the keys to the car of the single museum guard on duty, used it to make their getaway. Italy has long suffered from inadequate funds to protect it’s treasures. Often I’ve found myself alone in rooms full of priceless masterpieces wondering, “where’s the security?” The museum, itself a masterpiece, designed by Carlo Scarpa,(1906 Venice-1978), is quite frankly exquisite. Everything there, including the architecture and display are pure Scarpa.
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